Endocrinology

The Pituitary Gland

The pituitary gland is one of the most, if not the most, important gland in the endocrine system. So when we're talking puberty, we're talking this system right here. Your developing body, sexual reproduction , hormonal function these are all influced by your homones. Even your metabolism is affected by the endocrine system. Now back to the pituitary gland....it's a very tiny gland (as you can see below) that is broken into two lobes, or sections; the anterior (front) pituitary and the posterior (back) pituitary.

The Function

Like we mentioned before, this little gland is all about hormone secreation. They're secreated into the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. The question you should now be asking is which hormones does the pituitary gland secreate though? And that is a great question!

The anterior pituitary is responsible for the hormones listed below

  • Growth hormone

  • Puberty hormones (gonadotrophins)

  • Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH which stimulates the thyroid gland to make Thyroxine)

  • Prolactin and Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH which stimulates the adrenal stress hormone, cortisol) 1

The posterior pituitary is responsible for creating the fluid balance hormone called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH). Does anti-diuretic sound familiar? It should; check out our Urology page.

For a more in depth look at the pituitary gland check out this page HERE. Transitioning forward, the posterior pituitary is connected to the hypothalmus...

The Hypothalamus

The hypothalmus, which is often referred to as the "interbrian" is responsible for several functions including temperature regulation, hunger, thirst, sleep, mood, sex drive, and the release of additional hormones into the body.

 

 

The Function

 

Other Involvement

Kidney

Liver

Gonads

Heart

 

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April 26, 2017

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- Endocrinology
- Hormones
- Pituitary Gland
- Metabolism
- Lobe
- Anterior Pituitary
- Posterior Pituitary
- Gonadotophins
- TSH
- Growth Hormone
- Prolactin
- ACTH
- Adrenal
- ADH
- Hypothalmus